An Introduction To Film Budgeting - OFFICIAL DISCUSSION


#1

Your first reaction to the word “budget” is probably a bad one. But a budget is actually a creative and organizational tool to help you figure out how to make your project happen.

Producer Ashim Ahuja walks you through his approach toward making a budget, the advantages to having one, and getting creative when money is tight.

Want to get started? Here is a free budget template you can use to learn how everything is broken down:

Questions? Ask 'em below!


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#4

Great ! That Budget Template is exactly what I actually needed !


#5

How appropriate, i just started putting the budget for my big film together.
This is going to be really helpful.


#6

Here’s a question for you all. I know this drastically depends. But what would you say in the rough budgeting ratio for pre-production, production and post production?

The reason I ask being, working on a short film in the near future and they’re wanting to ideally only give 5-10% of the budget on the project to post production. Even though it will pretty much require 1 week of shooting and 4 weeks of post production. And this is a project with tons of visual effects and sound design work. Though I realize production costs more as it takes more personnel, etc.

But what are your personal opinions on this?


#7

I think it really depends on the project, as it could be a simple shoot, but a huge VFX/sound undertaking. Also for me, I am the one who does the editing, VFX, sound and colour, so time is the main cost in post-production.

It will depend on how many roles you will be covering yourself and how many additional people you will need for post (and the time it’ll take them).


#8

Hi @ukilledkenny7,

The short answer is it really does depend on the project. There isn’t a universal budget ratio because no production is exactly like another. I personally wouldn’t approach a budget that way because then I’d essentially be guessing - rough percentages don’t have anything to do with how much things actually cost. I’d break it down through my experience from previous shoots and quoting/contacting a bunch of people to find out actual costs so that I’d get realistic totals.

This rough ratio breakdown of pre-, production, and post could work when you have years of experience and you need to communicate quickly…but I would only trust really experienced producers to make those calls.

Your concern makes sense because we see this happen a lot - people want to throw money into production to get the most expensive equipment and post is an afterthought. 5-10% of your budget might totally work or it might be low for what your post team will actually need - you won’t know until you start applying actual figures and doing the math. Doesn’t sound like you’re the producer on this shoot but if you’re worried about it, you could put together some numbers together to rep what you think is adequate for post or voice your concerns. Always helps to say something in a constructive way than get to post and realize you have no money. Or worse, you have to drag it out and the movie never gets finished.

Hope that helps a little. Either way, hope you guys have a successful shoot!


#9

I really like this truk toy…I have an ideia about story whith this scene! kkkkkk…filmming whith low budget, is a brasilian skill, we never ever have money, or people, or many times crew…thats why here don´t have the same level of other countries.